Blog Headlines

Keep Chestnut Radio Rockin’
Please Donate $1 Today...


LOVE Furniture, New Jersey
Far Hills Pharmacy & Wellness Center, New Jersey
 
Broadcast Powered By MegaSeg
 
Thursday
Jan152015

10 Best Songs Of Bob Marley From Pinnacle To Kaya 


We asked listeners for the favorite Bob Marley Songs: In No Particular Order:

Three Little Birds

No Woman, No Cry

Redemption Song

Exodus

Satisfy My Soul

Rastaman Vibration

One Love

One Drop

Get Up, Stand Up

Turn Your Lights Down Low


Friday
Jan022015

Sweet 16 Top Albums Of 2014 (No Particular Order)


Sweet 16 Top Albums Of 2014 Chestnut Radio.com 
In No Particular Order
By Ralph J Rizzo

Goat- Commune
Conor Oberst-Upside Down Mountain
Jack White-Lazaretto
The War On Drugs-Lost in The Dream
Spoon-They Want My Soul
Kasabian-48 13
The New Pornographers-Brill Bruisers
Chrissie Hynde-Stockholm
Robert Plant-Lullaby & The Ceaseless Roar
Damon Albarn-Everyday Robots
St. Vincent-St. Vincent
The Black Keys-Turn Blue 
Ben Watt-Hendra
Sharon Van Etten-Are We There 
Swans-To Be Kind
Beck-Morning Phase

Friday
Jul112014

Young Neil: The Sugar Mountain Years By Sharry Wilson

Young Neil is a detailed chronological narrative of the early life of iconic Canadian musician Neil Young. Exploring a time in this Rock and Roll Hall of Famer’s life that has yet to be documented with such depth of research, Young Neil is an exhaustive document of his “Sugar Mountain” years, from 1945 to 1966. From his birth in Toronto through his school years in Florida, Ontario and Manitoba, the book examines the development of Young’s unique talent against a backdrop of shifting postwar values, a turbulent family history, and a musical revolution in the making. Includes many previously unseen photos, memorabilia, and set lists.

Friday
Jun202014

Nowhere To The Ramada Inn The Best Neil Young Songs

We asked Chestnut Radio Listeners For Their Favorite Neil Young Songs. The list is in no particular order

Sugar Mountain

Down By The River

Alabama

Unknown Legend

Like A Hurricane

Ambulance Blues

Cowgirl In The Sand

Harvest Moon

Cortez The Killer

Rockin' In A Free World

Cinnamon Girl

After The Gold Rush

Helpless

Walk On

Heart Of Gold

Saturday
May242014

Psychedelic Time Capsule Review: The Move "Shazam"

Proof of the long term effects of MSG on the human body... The Move- Shazam [Regal Zonophone / A&M 1970]by The Mickster - When "SHAZAM" was released in early 1970 I read a review from a "reputable" rock critic saying: "this is an artier version of the overly self-conscious mode I call stupid-rock, simultaneously gargantuan and prissy, like dinosaurs galumphing through the tulips." And those were his kind words. Well I found out that usually if "he" liked a record I usually thought it sucked and so on....you know the drill. So I decided, after 34 years, just to see how my now "older and more educated ears" hear this 12" slab of vinyl that was once on my turntable night and day.....here we go.....
 From the opening guitar riff I realized that "Hello Susie" is substantially different than the Amen Corner's hit of the same name "can this be the same song? I ask myself"...you betcha! 12 string it is. Roy Wood [guitar], Rick Price [bass], and Bev Bevan [drums] knock you senseless whilst Carl Wayne's vocals are devastatingly brutal, arguably delivering the best performance of his career. An uncharacteristic spare, heavy arrangement by Wood gives way to some of the greatest "drop-in" cockney background vocals ever" 'ello Suzie'. Bevan shines about 2:30 in with a tremendous drum fill bouncing around your speakers and nearly spilling out onto the floor ala Keith Moon. Wood ferociously attacks his 12 string Rickenbacker while Rick Price drives the whole thing over the cliff. Awesome stuff. The rock world hadn't heard an opening track that assaulted your senses since "Shape's Of Things" on Jeff Beck's 1968 monster, "Truth." Checking in at 4:56, "Hello Susie" is my favorite opening track on any album, anytime, anywhere. Hands down. 
Track 2- "Beautiful Daughter" starts after a street reporter bit. Carl Wayne shows off his vocal prowess with strings devil-dancing on top of a great arrangement by Wood. On this track they sound a little like the Move of old. A wonderful track stuck between two stunners holds it's own and wouldn't be out of place on a McCartney LP.
 
Track 3- Cherry Blossom Clinic [revisited] starts with Wood musing about his confinement to a mental hospital...."they gave me some food for me thoughts...." It's a hard rock remake of The Move's own classic "Cherry Blossom Clinic" that appeared on their self titled debut LP. Wood is at the top of his game with an arrangement that rocks, rolls, twists, & turns. After an acoustic bridge, a series of "composed" pieces rollercoaster around falling just short of plagiarism. Price's bass ties the song together and the production is just incredible. I give it a 95 because I can dance to it.
 
Track 4- "Fields of People" is a remake of a song originally done by American Art/Baroque rockers "Ars Nova". At almost 11:00 minutes there's plenty of room for the band to jam and Wood flex's his production muscle. Again the arrangement takes you on a journey through baroque pastures, show tunes, rock and [dare I say it] vaudeville whimsy. Halfway in you know your in for a treat when the arrangement starts to rock....Bevan has never sounded better.. "eh? what's this?"...the song takes another turn when Wood trades his guitar for a sitar and leads the way into a raga freakout that would get Ravi Shankar two steppin'! Let's recap: rock, baroque arrangements, show tunes, whimsy, and raga rock. Simply put: Incredible.
 
Track 5- Mann/Weil's "Don't Make My Baby Blue". Wood adopts a monster guitar tone that would make Jimmy Page [at the height of his powers] proud. Wayne emotes while Woodøs double tracked guitar morphs into a wah-wah freakout. Bevanøs drums are explosive. Devastating and heavy!
 
Track 6- The lads give a go at Tom Paxton's "The Last Thing On My Mind"-a beautiful finger-picked guitar, cymbal rides and Price's trademark bass lines lead the way for Wayne to again show what he got. He's almost crooning here, but the arrangement and performances are so great that your compelled not to bail and see where they take you. Wood teases the listener with short 12 string fills that wouldn't be out of place on a Byrd's album. In fact this cover reminds me of the Byrd's covering Dylan. Halfway in Wood takes off into Mighty Baby territory with one of the greatest 12 string / wah wah jams ever recorded. I'm on the floor begging for mercy!
 
Well there it is....smash or trash? The Move will never be inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Shame...er....Fame but that's par for the course and ok by me. In fact I hope they never do get nominated..."let those that enjoy the Hall's inductee's keep 'em.... Just don't mess with mine!
 
The Mickster, host of The Dangerous R&R Show.
Related articles

Proof of the long term effects of MSG on the human body... The Move- Shazam [Regal Zonophone / A&M 1970]by The Mickster - When "SHAZAM" was released in early 1970 I read a review from a "reputable" rock critic saying: "this is an artier version of the overly self-conscious mode I call stupid-rock, simultaneously gargantuan and prissy, like dinosaurs galumphing through the tulips." And those were his kind words. Well I found out that usually if "he" liked a record I usually thought it sucked and so on....you know the drill. So I decided, after 34 years, just to see how my now "older and more educated ears" hear this 12" slab of vinyl that was once on my turntable night and day.....here we go..... From the opening guitar riff I realized that "Hello Susie" is substantially different than the Amen Corner's hit of the same name "can this be the same song? I ask myself"...you betcha! 12 string it is. Roy Wood [guitar], Rick Price [bass], and Bev Bevan [drums] knock you senseless whilst Carl Wayne's vocals are devastatingly brutal, arguably delivering the best performance of his career. An uncharacteristic spare, heavy arrangement by Wood gives way to some of the greatest "drop-in" cockney background vocals ever" 'ello Suzie'. Bevan shines about 2:30 in with a tremendous drum fill bouncing around your speakers and nearly spilling out onto the floor ala Keith Moon. Wood ferociously attacks his 12 string Rickenbacker while Rick Price drives the whole thing over the cliff. Awesome stuff. The rock world hadn't heard an opening track that assaulted your senses since "Shape's Of Things" on Jeff Beck's 1968 monster, "Truth." Checking in at 4:56, "Hello Susie" is my favorite opening track on any album, anytime, anywhere. Hands down. 
Track 2- "Beautiful Daughter" starts after a street reporter bit. Carl Wayne shows off his vocal prowess with strings devil-dancing on top of a great arrangement by Wood. On this track they sound a little like the Move of old. A wonderful track stuck between two stunners holds it's own and wouldn't be out of place on a McCartney LP. Track 3- Cherry Blossom Clinic [revisited] starts with Wood musing about his confinement to a mental hospital...."they gave me some food for me thoughts...." It's a hard rock remake of The Move's own classic "Cherry Blossom Clinic" that appeared on their self titled debut LP. Wood is at the top of his game with an arrangement that rocks, rolls, twists, & turns. After an acoustic bridge, a series of "composed" pieces rollercoaster around falling just short of plagiarism. Price's bass ties the song together and the production is just incredible. I give it a 95 because I can dance to it. Track 4- "Fields of People" is a remake of a song originally done by American Art/Baroque rockers "Ars Nova". At almost 11:00 minutes there's plenty of room for the band to jam and Wood flex's his production muscle. Again the arrangement takes you on a journey through baroque pastures, show tunes, rock and [dare I say it] vaudeville whimsy. Halfway in you know your in for a treat when the arrangement starts to rock....Bevan has never sounded better.. "eh? what's this?"...the song takes another turn when Wood trades his guitar for a sitar and leads the way into a raga freakout that would get Ravi Shankar two steppin'! Let's recap: rock, baroque arrangements, show tunes, whimsy, and raga rock. Simply put: Incredible. Track 5- Mann/Weil's "Don't Make My Baby Blue". Wood adopts a monster guitar tone that would make Jimmy Page [at the height of his powers] proud. Wayne emotes while Woodøs double tracked guitar morphs into a wah-wah freakout. Bevanøs drums are explosive. Devastating and heavy! Track 6- The lads give a go at Tom Paxton's "The Last Thing On My Mind"-a beautiful finger-picked guitar, cymbal rides and Price's trademark bass lines lead the way for Wayne to again show what he got. He's almost crooning here, but the arrangement and performances are so great that your compelled not to bail and see where they take you. Wood teases the listener with short 12 string fills that wouldn't be out of place on a Byrd's album. In fact this cover reminds me of the Byrd's covering Dylan. Halfway in Wood takes off into Mighty Baby territory with one of the greatest 12 string / wah wah jams ever recorded. I'm on the floor begging for mercy! Well there it is....smash or trash? The Move will never be inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Shame...er....Fame but that's par for the course and ok by me. In fact I hope they never do get nominated..."let those that enjoy the Hall's inductee's keep 'em.... Just don't mess with mine! The Mickster, host of The Dangerous R&R Show.